Posts Tagged "Career Change"

Should you hire people into more junior roles than their last role? You can, but here are the potential pitfalls to consider.


6 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Our brains have been wired to think about our careers going up the corporate ladder over time. A manager becomes a director, a director becomes a vice president, a vice president becomes a president, etc.

Obviously, there are a lot fewer job positions the further you go up the ladder. A typical company may have 125 managers, 25 directors, five vice presidents and one president. The odds of moving up the ladder aren’t really in your favor, with 80 percent fewer positions at each next level.

But, people need to make a living. What happens when an employee needs to go back down the ladder to find more open positions? Is that a good idea for you as a hiring manager to consider that candidate?

Let’s find out.

Does the candidate have the right skills?

Let’s talk about the sales department as an example. Most “upper ladder” sales managers have been “lower ladder” salespeople at some point in their past careers. It is highly likely and logical that a sales manager has the knowledge and skills required to succeed as a salesperson again but the job of a sales manager is completely different from a salesperson. The salesperson mantains client relationships and closes sales all day. A sales manager manages and mentors the salespersons all day to make sure they are hitting their agreed upon targets. Making that shift back down the ladder really means taking on a completely different job again. You just have to be sure that candidate truly has the appetite for that change.

Related: Why MOD Pizza Loves Hiring Ex-Cons

Is the candidate willing to do the job required?

Continuing this example, once a sales manager gets used to the tasks of being a sales manager (more in the office, less travel, less repetitive tasks, the prestige that comes with the role) it is, for many, really hard to get back into a quota-hitting sales producer role. But, that is a more of a general guidance. There are exceptions to that rule. Maybe a sales manager got promoted, then realized they don’t like managing people — they actually prefer the “thrill of the hunt.” It is really important you ask the right questions during the interview process to ensure that candidate will actually be happy doing the work required in that “lower ladder” position.  Understanding that many will say whatever is required to get the job, so buyer beware.

Does the candidate have the right compensation expectations?

In addition to the role changing, the compensation is typically lower at lower levels. So, let’s say that vice president was making $150,000 and now they are looking at a director level job that makes $80,000. Once a worker gets used to living off a higher salary, it is really hard for them to make ends meet on a much smaller compensation. The only times that works out is if the role is combined with material other incentives (like an aggressive commission plan or equity upside to make up the difference), or if they are further along in their career and, perhaps, are aware of their need to reset their target role and compensation expectation to have a better chance of getting employed.

Related: 3 Signs You Need to Take a Pay Cut

Should you be worried if someone is willing to take a pay cut?

My off-the-cuff answer is yes — someone willing to take a pay cut should certainly trigger a concern but it isn’t necessarily a deal breaker. If other incentives are in place, or there is a logical “story” with this candidate, you may be perfectly fine. Remember, what you gain with an “upper ladder” candidate is all that extra years of experience that comes with that. So, if you can get comfortable with the situation, it is like getting a Porsche for the price of a Toyota. But, buyer beware.

Is the candidate a flight risk just waiting for a better position?

Once somebody gets used to getting paid at a certain level, they are going to try to maintain or exceed those levels in future jobs. If they are taking a job with you at half the compensation, without a matching good “story” or incentives, that opens the door to those candidates continuing to look for new jobs, even after they have accepted yours.

Again, that is a general rule of thumb. That may not be the case in all scenarios, so do your due diligence and make a judgment call. For example, someone looking for their last job before they retire could be perfectly fine and worth the risk.

Related: This Is How to Boost Employee Retention With Lifelong Learning

Do they have the energy for job?

Generally, a person’s energy declines with their age. But, that is not always the case. I have worked with many people in their 60’s whose energy levels exceed that of people in their 20’s. Another way to think about this: older “upper ladder” employees are typically more efficient in how they work. They may lack with energy but offset that with efficiencies they have honed with their prior years of experience.

Can a candidate going down the ladder ever be a good hire?

My colleague Todd Zaugg, CEO at Matrix Achievement, told me “Our company has trained over 40,000 salespeople over the years. I have seen many situations where moving down the corporate ladder has resulted in success and many other situations where it has not. In our experience there is no direct correlation between the previous upper ladder experience and  sales success moving back down into lower ladder positions. It all comes down to the individual and do they or don’t have have the right skill sets, desire and incentives to be successful in that lower ladder role”.

A lot of things have to go right for someone going back down the ladder to result in a good outcome for your business. But, that does not mean you should close the door on that scenario in all cases. You need to assess each candidate on their own merits. What is their “story”? How do they answer your questions? Do you believe they can live on a smaller compensation and have the energy and appetite to be successful in that “lower ladder” job?

This situation is laden with potential pitfalls, but it most certainly can work out for the best. Do your homework!


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If you’ve been contemplating ditching your 9-to-5 for self-employment, here are five things that will make your transition easier in the long-term.


7 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Starting a new business isn’t easy and it, of course, has its share of ups and downs.

Some months are outstanding (financially), while others aren’t.

Some months you’re in “pitch mode” to land new business and others you’re delegating work to be performed, hiring new team members, firing ones who aren’t working out and doing all the “things” that nobody on social media will ever know, hear or see.

For a person who’s historically been a “corporate intrapreneur” — otherwise referred to as someone who acts entrepreneurial yet is paid a salary as an employee of a company — to have full autonomy to show up and do your work on your terms while having the security blanket of a paycheck can be rewarding.

However, the thought of not having that direct deposit hit one’s bank account every 15th and 30th of the month can also be terrified to the point of paralysis by analysis.

“How will I pay my rent?”

“How will I make my mortgage next month?”

“How will I sustain my lifestyle?”

“How will I be able to afford expensive dinners and vacations?”

These are all questions that run through the minds of corporate intrepreneurs — who have an entrepreneurial mindset — and lead them to stay put more times than none.

It’s fear. It’s self-doubt. And, it’s real.

On Oct. 1, 2018, when my LinkedIn inbox became flooded with “Congrats on your work anniversary!” messages, I took a moment to reflect on what it took for me to walk away from a job that previously paid me over $150,000 per year.

For beginners, working a full-time job with a salary and benefits isn’t a bad thing if you look at it from the perspective of you’re being paid to learn new tasks and gain experience(s) which will you take with you for the rest of your career. Experience which someday you can charge large sums of money for.

Post-recession, circa 2012, I had to temporarily step away from being self-employed and go work for corporations to rebuild my credit and save up money, which had been nonexistent in the previous four-year period.

One of those jobs led me to start social media for Winn-Dixie, one of the largest supermarket chains in the U.S.; the other was working at LinkedIn, which relocated my family and me to San Francisco and opened up a new world of opportunities which previously didn’t exist.

However, there comes the point when the paycheck, company logo or work culture does not fulfill your needs, and you have to assess whether your purpose and passion are more important than a paycheck.

If you’ve been contemplating ditching your 9-to-5 for self-employment, here are five things that will make your transition easier in the long-term:

1. Have a bigger objective in mind outside of your day job.

If you cannot answer that you love your job, then you’re in the wrong position. I often will meet gainfully employed professionals who dislike their boss or the company that they work for but feel that staying put outweighs the risk of going elsewhere — including on their own. If you have years of experience and don’t think that your value is recognized within your organization and are being held down, perhaps think about freelance consulting on the side to get a feel for what it’s like cutting your invoices, sending out proposals and doing work independently.

2. Start building an identity outside of your current job title.

As soon as you get the “itch” to work for yourself, make your priority not what you will do but how you will do it. Begin with building a professional identity outside of your job title or company logo. Many working professionals are known as “James at X Company” or “Susan from Y Company” because they’ve built their entire legacy around being an employee of a high-profile organization — which is fine, but there comes the point where you need to create your own identity independent of that employer.

Begin writing for publications in your industry as your name only — unaffiliated with your employer or current job title. Start speaking more at industry conferences. Participate in online groups on Facebook and LinkedIn to grow your identity and thought leadership but also to network.

3. Secretly network within your network.

For two years before I exited my corporate job to start my social media marketing agency Gil Media Co., I met privately with close colleagues to share with them my vision for “next steps,” either at industry conferences or by phone. While you don’t want to share your intentions publicly with the world just yet, what you do want is for your closest colleagues to act as informal advisors who may have a job for you (on a freelance basis) or can introduce you to someone that might be looking for your expertise. You’d be surprised at exactly how many major corporations are looking for consultants or freelancers with your skill set and expertise.

4.  Don’t quit without paying clients.

Unless you’re fired or laid off from your job, do not quit unless you have a paying client or two. Not having guaranteed income will bring you stress which will make it harder for you to focus on the basics of getting a business up and running. Therefore, it is critical that you have income coming in from other sources before you become self-employed (by choice). You should also have at least six months of salary in liquid cash saved up to help you bridge the period between going out on your own to bringing in consistent business.

In my case, a year before leaving my corporate job I picked up a client (ironically from a free speaking gig)  which afforded me the ability to save cash that would eventually buy me a runway. 

5. Document the process.

Sharing your story is a competitive advantage. Why? Because it’s your story. Strangers will be more inclined to help you when they see someone who’s sharing their vulnerabilities. As I share in the video and short documentary above titled “Chasing Opportunity,” a layoff in the financial services industry in 2008 led me to discover social media as a gateway to rebuilding and rebranding myself, which led me down a new career path to where I find myself today. While my story is unique to me, it’s also real and relatable.

As you’re growing a new business document the process of growth — and sometimes failure — through daily stories on Instagram or Facebook. Leverage mediums like YouTube and LinkedIn, too, to amplify awareness around whatever your “hustle” is. You will find that there’s a world of opportunity waiting for you outside of your city or state if you see it. However, sharing who you are, what you do and what you want to accomplish is critical to unlocking it.

If you need advice to help with your transition, let’s connect on social media and discuss.

Watch more videos from Carlos Gil on his YouTube channel. Follow Carlos Gil on Instagram @CarlosGil83.

Related: How to Use Instagram for Lead Generation




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